Thursday, 29 May 2014

Sweden , USA and nuclear fallout

As it recently came to light that the global fall in lung cancer rates seem to occur in pretty much every country around 1990 and even in countries that continue with very high smoking rates, like Russia for example, I thought I would revisit the start of the global lung cancer epidemic.


The cigarette hypothesis, as a cause of the global epidemic , goes that because cigarettes are believed to cause ~90% of lung cancers then it must follow that the massive rise in lung cancer after the second world war must have been caused by the massive rise in cigarette use 20 years before before the war. But I think that just because people classified as smokers are at higher risk of lung cancer than people classified as never-smokers it does not follow that cigarettes drive lung cancer rates, as is suggested by the chart on the left.



I have created charts, see below, similar to the one above for Sweden as well as the US because I just happen to know that the rise in cigarette use in Sweden took place a good 25 - 30 years after the US.  If the 20 year time lag between cigarette use and lung cancer is true then it should happen in Sweden 20 years later too. Except that it does nothing of the sort. Sweden gets it's lung cancer epidemic just after 1945  just as in the US.



Clearly both lung cancer epidemics start just after 1945 but on the second chart Sweden's cigarette 'epidemic' starts at the same time as it's lung cancer epidemic. Where as the US cigarette 'epidemic' starts decades before it's lung cancer epidemic?!?
It is possible that cigarettes could cause lung cancer in the year of purchase as in Sweden and it is possible that cigarettes could cause lung cancer decades later as in the US but what is improbable is that both are true.


View full screen



In my mind the fallout hypothesis holds a better explanation because it starts in 1945 (trinity tests) and ends around 1985 (see left) and would be a greater risk for people who smoke cigarettes. Because if say a single exposure to a rainout between 1945 and 1985 for a non-smoker carries an unbelievably small individual risk of lung cancer then those people sucking through rain splattered paper tubes will have a higher risk. But over time, billions  of people exposed en masse to rainouts over decades could cause millions of  lung cancers and the risk would be higher where it rains more, such as is seen in US counties.

Sunday, 18 May 2014

Tobacco control will make you fat before they kill you




An interesting but not unsurprising chart. Pretty much every smoker in the world knows that if you quit smoking you start to get chubby and generally non-smokers tend to be a lot more chubby compared to smokers. And that's not forgetting that smokers have marginally lower blood pressure than our non-smoking friends and becoming a quitter increases your risk of high blood pressure independent of weight gain, see below.




Given that we are told that tobacco kills 6 million people world wide and that obesity and high blood pressure kills 6 million people world wide (source VGIF) . It would seem that the merchants of death in the tobacco control industry are giving the merchants of death in the tobacco industry a run for their money.

The difference being that the merchants of death in the tobacco control industry want to make you fat and ugly before they kill you and you don't get to spend a life time enjoying smoking.

It will be interesting to see if e-cig users have increased risk of weight gain and high blood pressure, time will tell. In the mean time  I am sticking to lovely cigarettes.

Source BMJ (Published 28 June 2011)

Tuesday, 17 December 2013

Lung cancer and rain - is there a link?

I recently discovered that a down loadable weather map for the US exists and that it could be obtained as a shape file  . This is handy because a shape file of weather patterns is just the ticket if you just happen to want to compare precipitation data with X over time and space .  


Chart loading data please wait a few seconds ...


Lung cancer heat map